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Disaster relief & housing

Legal Information

In this area you find information about finding emergency housing, renter's rights, dealing with insurance companies and getting help from FEMA.

  • Disaster Info for Renters/Tenants

    6374EN - Find out about your rights as a tenant if the place you are renting was damaged due to a natural disaster. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • FEMA Evacuee Hotel List

    Find hotels you may be able to get a room at paid for by FEMA. Read More

    By:
    FEMA
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Creating a Healthy Home: A Field Guide to the Clean-Up of Flooded Homes

    In emergencies and special situations, residents and volunteers may do mold clean-up work that would normally be done by trained mold remediation professionals. No matter who does the mold clean-up work, be sure to wear the necessary personal protective equipment and follow the work practices and procedures described in this guide for a safe and effective mold clean-up. Read More

    By:
    HUD
  • Disaster Advice for Veteran Homeowners

    This bulletin is distributed by the Department of Veterans Affairs to provide information during major disasters. The information given below is primarily for homeowners whose loans are guaranteed by VA. Content Detail

    By:
    Department of Veterans Affairs
  • DisasterAssistance.gov

    Enter your address to find out what help is available after a disaster. Apply online and read their fact sheet for useful information. Read More

    By:
    Disaster Assistance Improvement Program
  • Disaster Assistance: Small Business Administration Disaster Loans

    9905EN - The SBA has disaster assistance programs, including Home and Personal Property Disaster Loans and Business Disaster Loans. SBA can make low-interest disaster loans to homeowners, renters and businesses who have been victims of a disaster. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • FEMA Housing Portal

    The FEMA Housing Portal is intended to help individuals and families, who have been displaced by a disaster, find a place to live. Read More

    By:
    FEMA
  • FHA Disaster Relief: HUD Foreclosure Moratorium (FHA-insured mortgages only)

    Disaster Relief Options for FHA Homeowners - Was your home or your ability to make your mortgage payments harmed by an event that the President declared a disaster? You may qualify for relief to help you keep your home. Read More

    By:
    HUD
  • Handling Finances After A Natural Disaster

    Handling finances, mortgage payments, and credit card bills can be frustrating following a disaster. This site provides links to resources that may be of assistance. Read More

    By:
    Department of Financial Institutions
  • How to File a Flood Insurance Claim

    Steps to take and things you will need to file an insurance claim after a flood. Read More

    By:
    Legal Aid of Nebraska
  • HUD: Title One Home Improvement Loans

    Whether you want to fix a faucet or add a new addition to your home, you need to know the facts and the pitfalls of home improvements. Here are some sources that can help. Read More

    By:
    HUD
  • Map of Open Shelters

    Find shelters that are open near you. Read More

    By:
    Red Cross
  • Mortgage Insurance for Disaster Victims

    The Section 203(h) program allows the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) to insure mortgages made by qualified lenders to victims of a major disaster who have lost their homes and are in the process of rebuilding or buying another home. Read More

    By:
    HUD
  • Rehabilitation Mortgage Insurance

    FHA's Limited 203(k) program permits homebuyers and homeowners to finance up to $35,000 into their mortgage to repair, improve, or upgrade their home. Homebuyers and homeowners can quickly and easily tap into cash to pay for property repairs or improvements, such as those identified by a home inspector or an FHA appraiser. Read More

    By:
    HUD
  • Returning Home after a Disaster

    Returning home can be both physically and mentally challenging. Above all, use caution. You may be anxious to see your property but do not return to your home before the area is declared to be safe by local officials. Read More

    By:
    Ready.gov