Washington

Cash assistance for families (TANF and WorkFirst)

Legal Information

Family

In this section of Washington LawHelp you will find general legal information and resources about cash assistance for families in Washington state.

  • How to Present an Equitable Estoppel Defense at a DSHS Hearing

    7912EN - If you get an overpayment notice from DSHS saying that you owe them money or food stamps because they gave you benefits they should not have, and the overpayment was through no fault of yours, you should ask for a fair hearing, also called an administrative hearing. You have a legal defense against the overpayment. You must ask for the fair hearing within 90 days of the date of the overpayment notice. The notice may say the overpayment was unintentionally caused, rather than say it was administrative error. It will also say you have to repay it. It will not tell you that there is a legal defense against it. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Information for providers, clients, and advocates about the TANF Benefits Time Limit: February 1st, 2011

    DSHS will be instituting a lifetime limit for families enrolled in TANF effective February 1, 2011 Read More

    By:
    Seattle King County Coalition on Homelessness
  • Questions and Answers on the TANF 5-Year Time Limit

    7150EN - There is a sixty-month (five-year) time limit for receiving TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) and SFA (State Family Assistance) cash assistance. The existence of the time limit does not mean that your family will automatically stop receiving cash assistance at the end of 60 months. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • TANF and WorkFirst for College Students

    7138EN - If you get a TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) grant, you probably have to take part in WorkFirst if you want to go to college and keep getting TANF. Unless DSHS defers or exempts you temporarily from WorkFirst, you will have to participate in a WorkFirst activity for 32 to 40 hours a week. For most people, this first activity will be 12 weeks of intensive job search. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for Teen Parents

    7122EN - If you are a teenager under the age of 18, low income, and have children or are pregnant, you may be able to get help (money) from the state TANF program. Read on for answers to your questions about how to get TANF. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Welfare Benefits: TANF Rules and Eligibility

    7123EN - Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) is the welfare program that gives cash grants to needy families. This publication discusses who is eligible for TANF and what is required under the law. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
    Read this in:
    Russian / Pусский
    Spanish / Español
  • DSHS Help for People with Disabilities: Necessary Supplemental Accommodations

    7151EN - If you get DSHS benefits, such as TANF, SFA, Disability Lifeline, Medicaid, or food assistance, DSHS must accommodate your disabilities. This means that DSHS must try to make their services and benefits available to you to the same extent that they are available to people without a disability. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • How DSHS Treats Lump Sum Payments

    7140EN - Information you should know if you receive a lump sum payment from DSHS. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • National Center for Law and Economic Justice

    NCLEJ serves low-income families, individuals, and communities by advancing the cause of economic justice through ground-breaking, successful litigation and policy work around the country. Read More

    By:
    National Center for Law and Economic Justice
  • Questions and Answers about Workfirst

    7126EN - Almost all families who get TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) must participate in Workfirst. Most parents must do a job search program and take a job if one is offered. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
    Read this in:
    Russian / Pусский
    Spanish / Español
  • The Self-Sufficiency Calculator for Washington State

    The Calculator can help you: plan and develop career goals so you can work towards a better paying job; decide if a job you are considering will pay enough to meet your family's needs; determine if you might be eligible for public benefits that can help with expenses like health care or child care; test and compare different work or living options and see how they affect your bottom line. Read More

    By:
    Workforce Development Councils of Washington State
  • Washington State Self-Support Reserve

    Basic subsistence limitation chart for determining amount necessary to provide for basic needs. The amounts are adjusted annually. Read More

    By:
    Washington State
  • Workfirst and the Family Violence Amendment

    7124EN - DSHS will screen and identify TANF (Welfare) recipients for a history of family violence, notify TANF recipients about the Family Violence Amendment, maintain confidentiality, refer individuals needing counseling to supportive services, and waive Workfirst requirements where the requirements would make it more difficult to escape family violence, or put victims at further risk of family violence. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • WorkFirst News October 2011 PDF

    An overview of recent changes to the program. Content Detail

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • Additional Requirements for Emergency Needs (AREN)

    7108EN - If you apply and qualify for Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), State Financial Assistance (SFA), or a Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) welfare grant and you have an emergency, you may be eligible to get "Additional Requirements,” also known as AREN. AREN is one-time financial assistance for emergency needs. This publication explains who can get AREN and when you can get it. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español