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General Info (8)+

  • Eldercare Locator

    The Eldercare Locator is your first step for finding local agencies, in every U.S. community, that can help older persons and their families access home and community-based services like transportation, meals, home care, and caregiver support services. Read More

    By:
    eldercare.gov
  • Handbook for Washington Seniors

    The Handbook is a comprehensive quick-reference guide on the full range of legal issues seniors face. Read More

    By:
    Legal Voice
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Senior Services Web Site

    Senior Services can provide information and assistance to seniors on many issues. Read More

    By:
    Senior Services
  • How do I Sign Documents When I am Physically Unable?

    8401EN - As long as you are mentally competent to understand what you are signing, the fact that you cannot actually sign does not need to keep you from executing the document. Just follow the procedures we explain in this publication. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • Options for Grandparents and Other Nonparental Caregivers: A Legal Guide for Washington State

    A practical handbook for grandparents and other non-parent caregivers who want to understand their rights to establish and maintain legal relationships with the children in their care. Read More

    By:
    Legal Voice
  • Options to Avoid Property Tax Foreclosure

    If you have received notice in the mail, posted on your door, or delivered to you that says your home or your property is “subject to foreclosure,” “in foreclosure,” or will be “sold at auction” because of unpaid taxes, you may be able to stop or delay the foreclosure and sale of your home. #6235EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • Property Tax Exemptions for Senior Citizens and Disabled People

    The property tax exemption is a way to lower your property taxes by exempting (excusing you from) all extra levies, like school construction bonds and other levies passed by voters, and sometimes part of regular levies on your home. Publication #6230EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Quitclaim Deeds and Life Estates

    Before transferring any property, it is best to consult with a lawyer to find out all the possible consequences of the transfer in your specific circumstances. Some lawyers will provide services free of charge or for a reduced fee for low-income people. Contact your local bar association for more information. #6260EN Also called Quit Claim Deed. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project

Planning for Death (1)+

  • How do I Sign Documents When I am Physically Unable?

    8401EN - As long as you are mentally competent to understand what you are signing, the fact that you cannot actually sign does not need to keep you from executing the document. Just follow the procedures we explain in this publication. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project

Property tax (2)+

  • Options to Avoid Property Tax Foreclosure

    If you have received notice in the mail, posted on your door, or delivered to you that says your home or your property is “subject to foreclosure,” “in foreclosure,” or will be “sold at auction” because of unpaid taxes, you may be able to stop or delay the foreclosure and sale of your home. #6235EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • Property Tax Exemptions for Senior Citizens and Disabled People

    The property tax exemption is a way to lower your property taxes by exempting (excusing you from) all extra levies, like school construction bonds and other levies passed by voters, and sometimes part of regular levies on your home. Publication #6230EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español

Seniors & Consumer Fraud (1)+

  • Senior Fraud

    Consumers lose billions of dollars each year to fraud. People over age 50 are especially vulnerable and account for over half of all victims, according to a study conducted by AARP. People who commit these types of crimes, “con criminals,” often target older people knowing they have spent a lifetime earning their savings. Con criminals go wherever they can to find money to steal. They use everyday tools—the mailbox, the telephone, the Internet—to reach into your pocketbook. Read More

    By:
    Washington State Attorney General
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