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File an agreed petition for a parenting plan, residential schedule, or child support: Parentage cases

Read this in: Spanish / Español

Blank forms to print and fill out on your own, with how-to instructions for completing and filing. Use this if you are not married to or in a domestic partnership with your child’s other parent, your child’s parentage has already been established by parentage affidavit or acknowledgment, and you both want to ask the court to enter an agreed parenting plan and/or child support court order. Packet #3603EN Mini: #3277EN

Should I use this packet?

Yes, if all these are true: 

  • you are not married to or in a domestic partnership with your child’s other parent
  • your child’s parentage has already been established by paternity affidavit or acknowledgment
  • you and the other parent want to enter an agreed parenting plan and/or child support order 

* Use this packet only if you and the other parent agree 100% about all final papers (for parenting plan, child support). You just want final court orders that follow your agreement.

  • you and the other parent disagree about anything
  • someone besides you or the other parent has legal custody of a child in the petition

If any other person has physical custody or claims a right to custody or visitation, talk with a lawyer about whether to use this packet.
Generally, you can use this packet if parentage was established by signing a Paternity or Parentage Affidavit or Acknowledgment in Washington State, and you currently have no parenting plan. If you already have a parenting plan and you want to change it, you must file a Petition to Change Parenting Plan. Do not use this packet.

  • If you are using this after establishing parentage using a Paternity or Parentage Affidavit or Acknowledgment, make sure at least 60 days have passed since the filing of the Affidavit or Acknowledgment with the Washington State Department of Health. Call the Department of Health at (360) 236-4300 to find out when the Affidavit or Acknowledgment was filed.

This packet only discusses parenting plans. We do not recommend you file for a Residential Schedule. It does not say who can make decisions for the children. A parenting plan does. If you must use a Residential Schedule or have a strong preference, the form (FL Parentage 304) is available at courts.wa.gov/forms.
You can also use this packet and our Child Support Worksheets and Order packet to ask for a child support order. Or, you could just ask the Division of Child Support to start an administrative case for you. Read How Can I Collect Child Support? and Parentage and Parenting Plans for Unmarried Parents in Washington.
If a court established parentage less than 24 months ago, but did not sign a Parenting Plan, you can just file a motion for a parenting plan. Get the forms from the state courts website at courts.wa.gov/forms

  • Motion for Parenting Plan or Residential Schedule (within 2 years of Final Parentage Order), form number FL Parentage 317
  • Order on Motion for Parenting Plan or Residential Schedule, form number FL Parentage 318

* To change an existing parenting pan, use our File a Petition to Change Your Parenting Plan, Residential Schedule, or Custody Order packet.

  • Talk with a lawyer. (“What If I have Questions” below has referral info if you have a low income.)  Washington’s law about parentage has changed greatly. Figuring out if you can and should file for a parenting plan by agreement is complicated. Read Parentage and Parenting Plans for Unmarried Parents in Washington and talk to a lawyer. Even if you cannot afford to pay one to handle your case for you, a lawyer can advise about important legal rights your case may affect. Example:  if you file a petition for a parenting plan, the judge will decide which parent the children will live with, and how much time the children will spend with each parent. The judge will not necessarily order the parenting plan you asked for, even if you and the other parent agree on it.
  • If you are or the other parent is in the military or the dependent of a service member, the service member, or dependent should talk with a JAG officer about special protections.
  • Make sure you have a certified copy of your parentage or paternity affidavit or acknowledgment. See the question and answer below about requesting a certified copy.

* Dependents here are usually party, minor child, or a person who has gotten over half his/her support during the last six months from a service member who is a Washington resident on active duty and a National Guard member or Reservist.

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Get Legal Help

Visit Northwest Justice Project to find out how to get legal help. 

Last Review and Update: Jan 27, 2022
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