powered by probono.net

To leave this site now, use the X button.
If you are in danger, please use a safer computer.
In an emergency, call 911 or the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 (TTY 1-800-787-3224). Computer use can be monitored and is impossible to completely clear.

Text size: A A A

WashingtonLawHelp.orgWashington LawHelp

My Landlord Just Gave Me a 60-Day Notice

Authored By: Northwest Justice Project

Why did your landlord give you this notice? Is it legal? What should you do now? Read this to learn more. #6357EN

Contents

Please Note

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

I live in Washington State, should I read this? +

Yes, if you rent the place where you live and you just got a 60-Day Notice to Terminate your tenancy (or a 60-Day Notice to Vacate).  

 

No, if you own the mobile home you live in, and rent the lot. Read My Landlord Just Threatened to Evict Me from my Manufactured/Mobile Home Park and talk to a lawyer right away. Contact information is below.

 

What will you learn by reading this? +

  • What this notice is

  • What to do if you get this notice from your landlord

  • Where to get legal help

 

What is a 60-Day Notice? +

It is a warning from your landlord that you may need to move out within 60 days. Here is when your landlord can give you a 60-Day Notice:

 

  • The landlord has a "business or economic reason” to no longer rent the place. The landlord may have to prove in court that this reason is a “good” one.

  • You have gotten four or more written “10-Day Comply or Vacate” notices in the last 12 months for breaking important terms of the rental agreement. The notices all must be about different incidents.

  • You must register as a “sex offender” during the tenancy or you did not share that you are registered as a sex offender on your rental application.

  • You entered into a rental agreement for a certain time, like 6 to 12 months, between May 10, 2021 and three months after the end of the Governor’s eviction moratorium. Your landlord can give you a 60-day Notice to Terminate (end) your tenancy before the end of your lease or agreed end date. This applies when the landlord does not want to renew the agreement once it’s up.

  • You have a written rental agreement for a 6 to 12 month term, and your landlord doesn’t want to renew the agreement once it’s up. Your landlord can give you a 60-day written notice before the agreement is up.

  • You’ve had a written rental agreement for multiple 6 to 12 month terms, and you have never been a month-to-month tenant. Your landlord must give you a 60-day written notice if the landlord doesn’t want to renew the agreement again.

 

Does the termination notice have to be delivered in a certain way? +

Yes. The landlord (or their employee or another adult) can “personally serve” you at home by handing you the notice. The landlord can also hand it to another adult or older teenager living with you. The landlord can also tape it on your door, but then they must also mail a copy to you.

 

*The notice does not have to be notarized.

 

Can the landlord evict me just by giving me this notice? +

No. Washington law does not let landlords evict tenants without following the proper court eviction process. The landlord must give you a proper written “termination” notice before starting an eviction lawsuit. The 60-Day Notice is one type of this notice.

 

If you are still living in the place after 60 days, the landlord may then start an eviction court case.

The landlord must win that court case and get a judge to sign an order directing the sheriff to evict you. Only the sheriff can formally evict you or change the locks on the rental.

 

 

I got a 60-Day Notice. The landlord put in the notice that he has a business reason for not being a landlord anymore. But I saw this place posted online! The landlord is just going to rent the place out to someone else when I’m gone.  +

If you want to fight the eviction court case, talk to a lawyer right away. You will need to be able to prove your case in court. This means giving the court evidence proving the landlord did not have a business reason for ending your tenancy with a 60-Day Notice. It can also mean having witnesses with personal knowledge about the facts testify. A lawyer can help you with these things. See contact information in "Get Legal Help" below.

 

 

I got a 60-Day Notice. My langfdlord put in the notice that I didn’t tell them I had to register as a sex offender. But I did tell them when I applied.  +

You should also talk to a lawyer right away if this happens. You will need to be able to prove that you did tell your landlord about your registration as a “sex offender” when applying. This means giving the court evidence proving that the landlord has known. It can also mean having witnesses with personal knowledge about the facts testify. A lawyer can help you with these things. See contact information in "Get Legal Help" below.

 

*Read Getting Ready for a Court Hearing or Trial to get an idea of what you will need to do to fight the eviction in court.

 

 

Get Legal Help +

Visit Northwest Justice Project to find out how to get legal help. 

Download | Printer-friendly

Last Review and Update: Jun 21, 2021