Search results for contempt of court

Contempt of Court: When the other person in your case won’t follow a court order

General information about Washington law on contempt in family law cases. It covers only the type of contempt most common to family law cases, called “coercive civil contempt.” Find out how to have a person who is violating a court order obey that order in the future. #3107EN

If you have been served with a contempt motion

Basic info on why you got served and how you might be able to defend yourself. #3112EN

File a Motion for Contempt: Family Law Cases

Blank forms to print and fill out on your own, with how-to instructions for completing and filing. Use this if you already have a temporary or permanent parenting plan, child support order, or other family law order AND you want the court in the same Washington county to issue an order holding the other party in contempt for violating it. #3108EN

Respond to a Motion for Contempt: Family Law Cases

Blank forms to print and fill out on your own, with how-to instructions for completing and filing. #3110EN

Deployed during your parenting plan case: Your rights in Washington State

Read this if you are a parent of minor children AND serving in the armed forces AND in a court case over parenting plan issues. You should be aware of some laws passed for your benefit in 2009. #3233EN

Enforcing your Final Divorce Order: Money and Property Issues

How to enforce (make sure everyone follows) the final divorce order and collect the money or property your ex-spouse must pay or give you. #3234EN

Parenting Plans: General Info

What a parenting plan is and how to get one. Learn how to enforce or change a permanent parenting plan. #3230EN

Changing a Parenting Plan or Child Custody Order

Learn more about when and how you can change the final court order awarding custody and visitation of your children. This order might be a Custody Decree or Order, Residential Schedule, or Parenting Plan. #3104EN

Protections for Native American survivors of domestic violence

Congress enacted the Violence against Women Act (“VAWA”) in 1994 in response to the severity of violence against women and the need for a national strategic response. VAWA sought to improve criminal justice and community-based responses to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking in the United States. VAWA strengthened provisions to protect victims of domestic violence, hold offenders accountable and created programs to provide services for the victims. #3072EN

Divorce and Other Options for Ending Your Marriage with Children in Washington State

If you have children and are considering getting a divorce, read this first. This does not include court forms but will guide you to the forms you need. #3240EN

How Can I Collect Child Support?

Learn how the Division of Child Support (DCS), whose services are free, can help you set and collect child support. There is a locator service to help find parents who owe support. #3812EN

Divorce, Debt, and Bankruptcy in Washington State

A general overview of debt and bankruptcy issues related to divorce. #0102EN

Parentage and Parenting Plans

Learn the laws that apply when you have a child and you are not married to or in a registered domestic partnership with the child’s other parent. #3601EN

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