Search results for legal separation

Parenting Plans: General Info

What a parenting plan is and how to get one. Learn how to enforce or change a permanent parenting plan. #3230EN

Unmarried Couples: Washington Parenting Law

Basic information about Washington State law that applies to parenting when unmarried couples separate. #3912EN

File a Notice of Appearance

If you are served with a lawsuit, file a Notice of Appearance (NOA) to tell the other party and the court that you want to defend yourself in the case, and you want to get notice if anything else happens in the case. #9931EN

Getting Your Paperwork Ready So You Can Get Help with Your Family Law Case

Find out what paperwork and information you can get together for your appointment with the attorney, paralegal, volunteer or domestic violence shelter staff who will help you with your family law case. #3130EN

Make a Parenting Plan

A Washington Forms Online interview. Self-help court forms and instructions on LawHelp Interactive to create a Parenting Plan proposal or order in a family law case.

Child Support Worksheets and Order

A Washington Forms Online interview. Self-help court forms and instructions on LawHelp Interactive to calculate child support. Completes a proposed Child Support Order, Worksheets, and a Financial Declaration if needed.

How to get a name change in Washington State

In Washington State, if you are eighteen or older, you can choose and use any name you wish, as long as you are not trying to defraud (cheat) someone. This describes the process. #3400EN

How to use written questions and requests for documents in a family law case

Read this if you are a party in a contested family law case (“contested” means you and the other party disagree about issues) AND you want or need to get more information from the other party about their side of the issues. #3900EN

How to work with GALS and parenting evaluators

If you are involved in a divorce, parentage, or petition to change parenting plan case where the other parent does not agree with you, the court may appoint a Guardian ad Litem (GAL) or Parenting Evaluator. Here are some tips to help you work successfully with the GAL. #3106EN

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