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  • How do I Sue in Small Claims Court?

    In Small Claims Court, you can sue for up to $10,000. This is meant to be a quick, cheap way to resolve a dispute you could not otherwise settle. It is not complicated. Lawyers generally cannot take part. There are no juries, motions or objections. There is only a small charge for filing a lawsuit. You can get a trial date much sooner than in other courts. Most trials last about 20 minutes. #9940EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project

Get Ready for Court (4)+

  • How to File a Lawsuit in Federal Court

    Are you having a disagreement with another person, business or government agency? Are you thinking about going to court to ask a judge to resolve a disagreement or solve a problem for you? The federal court is one type of court that can help people resolve disputes. Read More

    By:
    United States District Court Western Washington
  • How to Format Court Documents

    When you give documents to a Washington state court, it is important to format the documents correctly. This document outlines the rules you must follow. #9938EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • How to Write a Demand Letter

    Someone owes you money. You bought something that does not work. A service provider did not perform the promised work. If you disagree with an individual or a company, and informal efforts to resolve your dispute fail, you should write a demand letter. #0316EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • If Someone Sues You in Small Claims Court

    Tips for trying to resolve your dispute and what to do if you need to appear in court. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project

I Need a Court Interpreter (2)+

Court Forms - listed alphabetically (4)+

  • Declaration Form - General Civil

    Declaration for general civil court cases. This form is not for family law cases. Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • How do I Sue in Small Claims Court?

    In Small Claims Court, you can sue for up to $10,000. This is meant to be a quick, cheap way to resolve a dispute you could not otherwise settle. It is not complicated. Lawyers generally cannot take part. There are no juries, motions or objections. There is only a small charge for filing a lawsuit. You can get a trial date much sooner than in other courts. Most trials last about 20 minutes. #9940EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • Quieting Title to Your Vehicle

    Use this if you have bought a car and have had a hard time getting title in your name. Some people call it applying for “ownership in doubt.” Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
  • Subpoenaing Witnesses and Documents

    If you are going to a hearing or trial where you will be giving evidence AND you need to make sure that a witness shows up or that someone brings documents or other items, you can have the person served with a subpoena issued by the court clerk. Publication #9930EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project

Court Information - listed alphabetically (4)+

  • Guide to Washington Courts

    An overview of the Washington court system. Read More

    By:
    Administrative Office Of The Courts
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Mediation: Should I Use It?

    Mediation is an informal way to resolve disputes without going to court. The parties attempt to negotiate a mutually agreeable settlement with the help of a neutral mediator. Mediation can be used in many types of disputes. #3226EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
    Russian / Pусский
  • Washington Court Rules

    State and local court rules for Washington. Read More

    By:
    Administrative Office of the Courts
  • What are Working Copies?

    When you “file” documents with a court, you give the court documents for processing. Often you also need to give a court “working copies” of the same documents. The judge or commissioner will use these extra copies to prepare for your case. That way the court does not need to make copies itself. #9952EN Read More

    By:
    Northwest Justice Project

Legal Research (3)+

Working with a Lawyer (2)+

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