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Paternity/Parentage

Know Your Rights
10 Resource(s) Found

How Do I Request a Copy of my Washington State Acknowledgment of Parentage?

How to get a copy of a Paternity Affidavit, Paternity Acknowledgment, or Acknowledgment of Paternity (all the same thing). #3612EN

How to Become a Legal Parent in Washington

Washington law provides several ways for people raising children together to become legal parents. This publication covers: 1. Legal parentage; 2. Becoming a legal parent; 3. Other options for people who are not legal parents; 4. Parenting after divorce/separation; and 5. Resources

I Was Served with Parentage (or Petition for Parenting Plan or Child Support) Papers

If you were served with parentage, petition for parenting plan or child support papers, you must respond promptly. If you do not respond on time, the other party may automatically win. You may have as few as four business days to file a response. This will help you figure out what to do. #3614EN

My legal rights: I was raped and became pregnant

If you were raped and became pregnant, you have options for limiting the rapist's rights to the child. #3660EN

Parentage and Parenting Plans

Learn the laws that apply when you have a child and you are not married to or in a registered domestic partnership with the child’s other parent. #3601EN

Should I file a domestic violence protection order (DVPO)?

If you are being hurt, threatened or stalked, try to talk with a domestic violence program. The National Domestic Violence Hotline is 1-800-799-SAFE. This explains things to think about before filing a DVPO. #3703EN

Washington Parenting Law for Unmarried Couples

Basic information about Washington State law that applies to parenting when unmarried couples separate. #3912EN

Guardian Ad Litem Report: The basics and how to respond

If you're fighting about a parenting plan in a family law case in a Washington court, read this to learn what a guardian ad litem does, why the report matters, and how to respond to a report when its recommendations don't help you. #3111EN

Guardians ad Litem in Family Law Cases

A judge may appoint a guardian ad litem (GAL) in a court case about custody or visitation rights. Any party to the case may ask for appointment of a GAL, or the judge can decide to appoint one. This packet has the necessary forms and instructions. #3103EN

How to Work with GALs and Parenting Evaluators

If you are involved in a divorce, paternity or non-parent custody case where the other parent does not agree with you, the court may appoint a Guardian ad Litem (GAL) or Parenting Evaluator. Here are some tips to help you work successfully with the GAL. #3106EN

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