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Domestic Violence

Know Your Rights

Domestic Violence: Can the Legal System Help Protect Me?

Learn the definition of domestic violence, how you can protect yourself and your family by getting a protection order or restraining order, and where to get help. #3700EN

Should I file a domestic violence protection order (DVPO)?

If you are being hurt, threatened or stalked, try to talk with a domestic violence program. The National Domestic Violence Hotline is 1-800-799-SAFE. This explains things to think about before filing a DVPO. #3703EN

Landlord/Tenant Issues for Domestic Violence Survivors

Learn about how the law can protect you if you are a tenant AND a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, unlawful harassment or stalking. #6304EN

Coronavirus (COVID-19): The person who harmed you might be released from prison

How to find out if the person who hurt you will be released from prison early due to COVID-19. #3712EN

Frequently Asked Questions about Abuse in Later Life

Abuse in later life occurs when an older person is subjected to a pattern of coercive behaviors used to gain & maintain power and control perpetrated by a family member or someone with whom the elder has an ongoing relationship. It is the intersection between elder abuse and domestic violence.

How to hide your address from a stalker or abuser

Survivors of abuse, sexual assault, trafficking, or stalking can enroll in a state-run program to keep their address from the person who has been abusing, stalking or harassing them. #3706EN

Immigration, Family Law, and Domestic Violence

If you have a protection order case or family law matter, you may have immigration questions or concerns. People who are abusive often use immigration status to control their partners. Read this for basic answers to some common questions. #8105EN

Leave from Work for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking

Washington State law allows employees to take time off from work to address domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. Read this to learn more about your rights.

Name Change

In Washington State, if you are eighteen or older, you can choose and use any name you wish, as long as you are not trying to defraud (cheat) someone. This describes the process. #3400EN

Protection Order Advocacy Program

A protection order is an order, issued by a judge, to protect a person from another person whose behavior is abusive, threatening, exploitive or seriously alarming. This describes the different types of orders.

Protections for Native American survivors of domestic violence

Congress enacted the Violence against Women Act (“VAWA”) in 1994 in response to the severity of violence against women and the need for a national strategic response. VAWA sought to improve criminal justice and community-based responses to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking in the United States. VAWA strengthened provisions to protect victims of domestic violence, hold offenders accountable and created programs to provide services for the victims. #3072En

VAWA Self-Petition: Immigration Relief for Victims of Domestic Violence

If a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident family member uses their immigration status to control or abuse you, you may be able to file an I-360 VAWA Petition. This petition lets you try to get status without the help of the abusive family member. #8125EN

Victims of Crimes and “U Visas”

A U visa or U nonimmigrant status is sometimes given to people who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are victims of certain crimes in the U.S. If you or someone in your family (spouse, child, sibling, or parent) is the victim of a crime, you might be able to change your immigration status. You may be able to apply for a U visa. #8124EN

Webinar: Protective Parenting Plans

A webinar to discuss creating a protective parenting plan when there are concerns of domestic violence or parenting deficits that are detrimental to the children. This webinar will discuss parenting plans and provide a general overview for self-represented people of some important court rules to help you understand how to get a temporary motion for a parenting plan before the court.

Immigration, Family Law, and Domestic Violence

If you have a protection order case or family law matter, you may have immigration questions or concerns. People who are abusive often use immigration status to control their partners. Read this for basic answers to some common questions. #8105EN

VAWA Self-Petition: Immigration Relief for Victims of Domestic Violence

If a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident family member uses their immigration status to control or abuse you, you may be able to file an I-360 VAWA Petition. This petition lets you try to get status without the help of the abusive family member. #8125EN

Victims of Crimes and “U Visas”

A U visa or U nonimmigrant status is sometimes given to people who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are victims of certain crimes in the U.S. If you or someone in your family (spouse, child, sibling, or parent) is the victim of a crime, you might be able to change your immigration status. You may be able to apply for a U visa. #8124EN

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