Search results for representing yourself in court

Representing yourself at an administrative hearing

If you do not agree with any verbal or written decision made by the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), you can appeal that decision by asking for an administrative hearing. Read this to learn when and how to ask for a hearing, how to get ready for your hearing, and what to expect at your hearing and afterward. #7910EN

How to represent yourself at an unemployment benefits hearing

If you lost your job, applied for unemployment benefits, and were turned down, you can appeal. If you were awarded unemployment benefits, your former employer can appeal. Read this to learn how to represent yourself at the hearing on an appeal. #7600EN

Getting ready for a court hearing or trial

Tips on how to represent yourself and prepare for a court appearance. #3210EN

Petitioning for Superior Court Review: When you disagree with a DSHS/HCA benefits administrative hearing

If you appealed an agency decision about your public benefits and lost your administrative hearing, you can appeal the administrative law judge's decision. This packet explains when and how to do so, and has forms you can use. Packet #7917EN

How do I appeal the denial of my unemployment benefits to Superior Court?

This explains Superior court review of an administrative decision relating to unemployment benefits. If you lose your claim at the administrative hearing, you have another level of administrative review. It is called a “Petition for Review.” #7602EN

What if I am being sued in Washington State and I live out-of-state?

Provides general info for people who live outside Washington AND have been served with a petition or complaint filed with a court in Washington State. #9928EN

The TANF five-year time limit

You might only be able to get TANF or SFA for 5 years. Read this to learn more. #7150EN

When Social Security ends or reduces your SSI or SSDI for non-disability reasons

Social Security must notify you in writing before lowering (reducing) or stopping (terminating) your benefits. You may fight the termination by asking for reconsideration. You may continue to get the same benefits after the termination date in the notice if you request reconsideration in time. You must request reconsideration within ten days of the date on the notice to keep getting benefits. #7400EN

Child Support Worksheets and Order

A Washington Forms Online interview. Self-help court forms and instructions on LawHelp Interactive to calculate child support. Completes a proposed Child Support Order, Worksheets, and a Financial Declaration if needed.

I am age 12 – 16. What are my rights in a minor guardianship case?

If you are a teen and someone has filed to have a court appoint a guardian for you, read this to find out what your rights are. #4402EN

CPS Investigations and Findings

CPS findings of abuse or neglect can keep you from working or volunteering with children, developmentally delayed adults, or the elderly for the rest of your life. Learn about your rights and responsibilities when CPS makes a finding against you. #2950EN

Divorce and Other Options for Ending Your Marriage without Children in Washington State

If you have no children and want to get a divorce or dissolution of domestic partnership, read this first. This does not include court forms but will guide you to the forms you need. #3241EN

HUD Housing Evictions

Learn about the additional protections you have if you live in certain HUD-subsidized buildings or rental units, and what you can do to avoid an eviction. #6103EN

Protecting Your Section 8 Voucher

A detailed explanation of your responsibilities under the Section 8 Voucher program, and what rights you have if the Housing Authority (HA) tries to cut off your voucher. #6113EN

Child Protective Services (CPS) and Dependency Actions

Read this if you are involved with Child Protective Services, but there is no court case or if the State of Washington (through DSHS, CPS, the Prosecutor, or the Attorney General’s Office) has filed a court case to take your child from you. #3120EN

Fighting an overpayment of cash or medical assistance

Use this when the Department of Social & Health Services (DSHS) or Health Care Authority (HCA) notifies you of a cash or medical overpayment. An overpayment is when you get benefits you are not eligible for according to DSHS or HCA rules. #7104EN

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